DIABETES 2: IT´S NOT THE SUGAR…IT´S THE FAT – Part 3

Maybe the most difficult concept for people to accept is that reversal of chronic diseases is not only possible but is actually a re-occurring fact. This is especially true for the chronic diseases that are most effected by what we eat, including heart disease, cancer, high blood pressure and diabetes 2. Yes, we can sometimes control diseases and in some cases, bring about remission for short periods of time, but to claim that a disease can be reversed is not something that will easily roll off your doctor´s tongue. It´s just not part of the medical culture and it´s not information that one would expect to see or hear about…in the media.

For Diabetes 2 – Part 3, the following are some comments from…

Dr. Neal Bernard – http://www.pcrm.org

Imagen relacionada

Blood sugar levels are high in diabetes, so a common idea has held that eating sugar somehow triggers the disease process. However, the major diabetes organizations take a different view. The American Diabetes Association1 and Diabetes UK2 have labelled this notion a “myth,” as has the Joslin Diabetes Center,3 which wrote, “Diabetes is not caused by eating too much sugar.” These and other organizations have worked to educate people about the causes of diabetes and the role that foods play in the disease process.

Type 2 diabetes typically starts with insulin resistance. That is, the cells of the body resist insulin’s efforts to escort glucose into the cells. What causes insulin resistance? It appears to be caused by an accumulation of microscopic fat particles within muscle and liver cells.4 This fat comes mainly from the diet—chicken fat, beef fat, cheese fat, fish fat, and even vegetable fat. To try to overcome insulin resistance, the pancreas produces extra insulin. When the pancreas can no longer keep up, blood sugar rises. The combination of insulin resistance and pancreatic cell failure leads to type 2 diabetes.

Dr. Michael Greger – http://www.nutritionfacts.org

Type 2 diabetes has been referred to as the 21st century’s Black Death in terms of its exponential spread around the world and devastating health impacts. Instead of the bubonic plague, though, its pathological agents may be high-fat and high-calorie diets.
Type 2 diabetes, however, is almost always preventable, often treatable, and sometimes even reversible through diet and lifestyle changes. Like other leading killers—especially heart disease and high blood pressure—type 2 diabetes may be an unfortunate consequence of dietary choices. There is hope, though, even if you already have diabetes. Through lifestyle changes, you may be able to achieve a complete remission of type 2 diabetes, even if you’ve been suffering with the disease for decades.

People who eat a plant-based diet have been found to have just a small fraction of the diabetes rate seen in those who regularly eat meat. As diets become increasingly plant-based, there appears to be a stepwise drop in diabetes rates. Based on a study of 89,000 Californians, flexitarians (who eat meat maybe once weekly rather than daily) appear to cut their rate of diabetes by 28 percent, and those who cut out all meat except fish appear to cut their rates in half. What about those eliminating all meat, including fish? They appear to eliminate 61 percent of their risk. And those who go a step farther and drop eggs and dairy, too? They may drop their diabetes rates 78 percent compared with people who eat meat on a daily basis.

T. Colin Campbell, Phd – http://www.nutritionstudies.org

Modern drugs and surgery offer no cure for diabetics. At best, current drugs allow diabetics to maintain a reasonably functional lifestyle, but these drugs will never treat the cause of the disease. As a consequence, diabetics face a lifetime of drugs and medications, making diabetes an enormously costly disease. The economic toll of diabetes in the U.S.: over $245 billion in 2013, up from $113 billion in 2000.

But there is hope. In fact there is much more than hope, if we simply keep an open mind. The food we eat has enormous influence over this disease. The right diet not only prevents but also treats diabetes. What then is the “right” diet? All findings support the idea that both across and within populations, high fiber, whole plant based foods protect against diabetes, and high fat, high protein, animal based foods promote diabetes.

In this life we need to be properly educated, which means to be fully informed. If not, then the possibility of making the right choices, becomes extremely limited. With regards to health education and nutrition, if we do not have enough right information, how can we make intelligent and conscious choices? I hope that this 3 part series, including the input from the “wise” doctors, has shed enough light on the topic of type 2 diabetes, that it becomes an eye opener for those suffering with the disease as well as for the general public.

For those interested in more clarity on the subject of diabetes 2 and diet, I invite you to watch the following 26 minute video with special guest, Dr. Wes Youngberg. This module was part of the recently concluded, 9 episode, online series, iThrive: Rising from the depths of Diabetes and Obesity. The presenter of this module actually reversed his diabetes by the end of the series…and lost 60 pounds to boot.

Here´s the link:

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s